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5 Ways to Keep the Bounty of the Season from Expanding Your Waistline

Thanksgiving may be over but it is my favorite holiday. I love the fall colors, the warm oven, the amazing smells coming from the kitchen, and the chance to give thanks for abundance. Thanksgiving is a time for celebrating — and it’s also a time for overeating. Read more

Eye specialist says proper nutrition can treat and reverse common vision problems

Dr. Robert Abel Jr, MD author of the new book, The Eye Care Revolution, will reveal which nutrients are essential for the care and feeding of your eyes

For 40 years, Dr. Robert Abel Jr. has dedicated his professional life as an ophthalmologist to preserving vision. As a founding partner in a large eye care practice in Delaware, he operates on four hundred cataract patients a year, but he treats six times that number without surgery.

“We know that specific foods and nutritional supplements have value in treating specific diseases, and we also now know there are also certain foods and supplements that specifically encourage eye health,” says Dr. Abel, author of the book, “The Eye Care Revolution.”

Dr. Abel says by using an understanding of nutritional chemistry and other means it is possible to control or eliminate many of the factors that contribute to the development of serious eye diseases:

 

  • Controlled clinical studies show that the risk of developing cataracts can be decreased by more than half by eating fruits and vegetables rich in vitamin C, as well as the antioxidants vitamin A, E, lutein, and glutathione boosters.
  • The risk of developing glaucoma can be lowered by consuming high levels of vitamins C, Omega 3, and B12. Also rhythmic breathing and avoiding blood pressure medications in the evenings.
  • The risk of developing macular degeneration can be reduced by maintaining high levels of vitamins A, D, E, the carotenoids zeaxanthin and lutein, DHA, and the amino acid taurine (found in egg whites).
  • Diabetic retinopathy can be delayed or prevented by consuming vitamin C along with alpha lipoic acid, Quercetin, and other bioflavonoids.

What is the ideal dietary regimen for someone concerned about preserving or improving eye health? In his book, “The Eye Care Revolution,” Dr. Abel lists the Top Ten Foods for Sight:

  1. Cold water fish (sardines, cod, mackerel, tuna) are an excellent source of DHA, which provides structural support to cell membranes and is recommended for dry eyes, macular degeneration, and sight preservation.
  2. Spinach, kale, and green leafy vegetables are rich in carotenoids, especially lutein and zeaxanthin. Lutein protects the macula from sun damage and from blue light.
  3. Eggs are rich in cysteine, sulfur, lecithin, amino acids, and lutein. Sulfur-containing compounds protect the lens of the eye from cataract formation.
  4. Garlic, onions, shallots, and capers are also rich in sulfur, which is necessary for the production of glutathione, an important antioxidant for the lens of the eye.
  5. Non-GMO soy, low in fat and rich in protein, contains essential fatty acids, phytoestrogens, vitamin E, and natural anti-inflammatory agents.
  6. Fruits and vegetables contain vitamins A, C, E, and beta-carotene. Yellow and orange vegetables, like carrots and squash, are important for daytime vision.
  7. Blueberries and grapes contain anthocyanins, which improve night vision. A cup full of blueberries, huckleberry jam, or a 100 mg bilberry supplement should improve dark adaptation within 30 minutes.
  8. Wine, known to have a cardio-protective effect, has many important nutrients, which protect the heart, vision, and blood flow.
  9. Nuts and berries are nature’s most concentrated food sources. Grains, such as flaxseed, are high in the beneficial Omega-3 fatty acids, which help lower cholesterol and stabilize cell membranes.
  10. Extra-virgin olive oil, is a healthy alternative to butter and margarine.

Dr. Abel says to maintain eye health, drink six eight-ounce glasses of filtered water every day to keep properly hydrated, as water helps create the fluid in our eyes.

New Dietary Supplement for Eye Health: Eye Complex CS (Clinical Strength)

“While we should depend primarily on whole foods to meet our nutritional needs, we should use vitamins and supplements as an insurance policy,” says Dr. Abel.

For eye health, Dr. Abel has formulated a special multivitamin, Eye Complex CS, which contains important nutrients supportive of the retina and having a protective effect on the lens:

 

Vitamin C 250 mg N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) 50 mg Selenium .05 mg
L-Glutathione 2.5 mg Alpha Lipoic Acid 25 mg Vitamin E 100 IU
Lutein 10 mg Zinc 7.5 mg Bilberry 40 mg
Zeaxanthin 0.5 mg Taurine 50 mg Riboflavin B-2 15 mg
Vitamin B-6 10 mg Vitamin B-12 0.1 mg Rutin 100 mg
Grape Seed Ex 25 mg Citrus Bioflavonoids 100 mg Chromium .05 mg
Ginkgo biloba 20 mg Beta Carotene 10,000 IU Eye Bright 100 mg
CoQ10 10 mg Green Tea Ex 50 mg Green Tea Ex 50 mg

ABOUT DR. ROBERT ABEL, JR., MD (www.eyecomplexcs.com)

Dr. Abel earned his medical degree at Jefferson Medical College in 1969, completed his ophthalmology residency at Mt. Sinai Hospital and was a Cornea Fellow at the University of Florida. A board certified ophthalmologist, Dr. Abel is on the staff of the Christiana Care Health System. He is a former Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology at Thomas Jefferson University. He founded and has been Medical Director of the Medical Eye Bank of Delaware since 1981. He teaches locally and internationally on numerous subjects, including cornea, cataract and nutrition. He instructs the Cornea Microsurgery Workshops at the Academy of Ophthalmology meetings annually and has been on the Academy’s Committee of International Ophthalmology.

Dr. Abel has done active research on corneal transplants, corneal pathology, contact lenses and drugs as they relate to the eye. He holds two patents on artificial corneas and has received the AAO Honor Award and the Senior Honor Award. Dr. Abel is the author of the popular new book, “The Eye Care Revolution,” which teaches patients how to treat and reverse common vision problems, and he has written eight other books. Other information concerning eye care can also be found on his website, EyeAdvisory.com. He was also voted “TOP DOC” by Delaware Today Magazine. In his spare time, he practices Tai-Chi, and studies alternative medicine systems.

4 super foods that battle arthritis pain

“You are what you eat,” has been a motto from an early age. Now that you’ve aged, it’s time to put those words into action. According toEveryday Health, about 46 million adults in the United States, about one in five Americans, have been diagnosed with some form of arthritis. This number continues to rise and is expected to jump dramatically in the coming years. While there is no cure for arthritis, there are certain measures you can take, namely preventive foods, to help combat the chronic sickness. Take a look at the list below, and see what you need to add to your diet to help ease some of arthritic pain.

Omega-3 fatty acids

There are so many ways to introduce these essential fatty acids into your system that will help combat arthritis and alleviate some inflammation. Charles Serhan, Ph.D., director of the Center for Experimental Therapeutics and Reperfusion Injury at Harvard Medical School, found that omega-3s convert into compounds that aid in bringing the inflammatory response in the human body to an end.

There is no certainty to how much omega-3 is required, but if you’re not keen on adding some fish to your diet, be sure to get some omega-3 fatty acid supplements.

Broccoli

It’s time to go a little greener. Several lab studies have found that sulforaphane, a compound in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables, may block enzymes linked to joint destruction and inhibit inflammation. Be adventurous with this vegetable. Make it a fun kitchen project to find the most delicious ways to cook this green giant of a vegetable.

Spice it up

Seasonings go beyond that extra little flavoring. It’s been shown that ginger and turmeric possess anti-inflammatory properties. Experiment a little. You can make turmeric tea as part of your nightly routine.

Strawberries

To round off a few foods to help ease arthritis pain, here is one for that sweet tooth. Not only is this delicious fruit perfect for a summer day, it can help lower blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a signal of inflammation in the body, which is helpful for arthritis pain.

So the next time you find yourself at the grocery store or out to dinner, consider the long-term effects of the foods you consume. Fill your plate or basket with things that can help you overcome chronic pains, like arthritis, that are also delicious. Don’t be afraid to try new things, you never know how much it could help you.

7 healthiest foods for seniors — and the rest of us

According to the World Health Organization, unhealthy diets are among the leading causes of non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. As you age, eating can become more of a chore than a fun part of your day. Whether you face difficulty chewing, upset stomach, low energy or dry mouth, there are ways you and your family can bring light back into the kitchen. Focusing on increasing the intake of specific nutrients and proteins is the best way to supplement the supplements you may be taking. Here is a list of the seven best foods to keep in your diet as you age.

1. Eggs

Eggs pack a powerful protein punch and are high in B12, which increases energy. They are soft if you or your loved one has difficulty chewing, and they have enough natural moisture to aid those with dry mouth. If cholesterol is a concern, try eating one regular egg and supplementing with egg whites.

2. Lean Beef

Beef is another great way to add protein to your diet, and it is also considered to be a “brain” food. To ensure nutrients are at their optimum, choose grass-fed beef, which has higher amounts of fatty acids and B complexes. Beef also contains choline, which promotes memory and immune system health. Looking for other options instead of steak? Try a beef minestrone soup, or a lean burger, instead.

3. Greek Yogurt

Greek yogurt is rich in calcium with half the sugar and sodium content found in regular plain non-fat yogurt. Greek yogurt is another great source of protein, especially for vegetarians. Yogurt wets the pallet and goes down easy for those with dry mouth. Not loving the plain flavor? Try adding agave nectar and berries for an organic option packed with antioxidants.

4. Dark Greens

Spinach and kale are among Mother Nature’s heavy lifters when it comes to natural sources of essential vitamins. Spinach is high in iron, magnesium and potassium, which are great for carrying oxygen to the lungs, fighting chronic fatigue and keeping blood sugars low. Kale promotes bone growth with high amounts of calcium and increased immune system strength as a great source of vitamin A. More importantly, kale offers tons of vitamin K which is helpful for blood clotting. Try sauteed spinach or adding kale to a fruit smoothie. Here are some great recipes for massaged kale salads, which help the dense vegetable soak up more flavors for eating.

5. Quinoa, Brown Rice and Flax Seed

Healthy grains are a great way to add dietary fiber to your eating plan. Not only is fiber important for a healthy digestive system, but these alternatives to wheat also contain natural sources of Vitamin B-1, Manganese, and essential fatty acids. Quinoa and brown rice are great sides to a complete lunch or dinner mixed into a salad or standing alone. Flaxseed can be added to almost any recipe or blended in a smoothie.

6. Berries

Blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries are excellent sources of antioxidants. Fruits that are rich in color can aid in lowering blood pressure, enhance fiber intake, and promote health for those with diabetes. Berries are great added to a salad, over yogurt or steel-cut oats or blended into a smoothie.

7. Fish

Fatty fishes, including salmon, are a rich source of Omega 3s. Omega 3s contain myriad health benefits that are essential for a healthy senior diet. In addition to enhancing heart health, Omegas are known to aid in decreasing effects of rheumatoid arthritis, increasing bone density to avoid osteoporosis, and preventing the risk of memory loss with dementia and Alzheimer’s. Baked or grilled salmon is easy to make and goes great with a variety of sides, salads, and grains to make it suitable for all seasons.

While aging can bring complications with some of our favorite past-times, getting older does not have to put a damper on the way we eat. Eating a well-planned and balanced diet may reduce the risk of bone loss, stroke, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and some forms of cancer. Ensuring our meal selections are rich in vitamins and come from natural and organic sources will not only appease the pallet but will also add nutrients that are essential for promoting increased energy and aiding longevity.